You’re Conditioned

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I was talking to a white guy about speaking on the protests and why they shouldn’t put focus on the looters they replied, “I can’t talk about an issue without addressing the full matter.” At that point I checked out of the conversation because even though this guy was a “good White person”, I was exhausted from trying to educate them. But after some rest, I want to address this idea of the “whole issue” because claiming not to be able to compartmentalize is bullshit. We all do it all the time, there’s no reason it can’t be done here EXCEPT for our social conditioning.

When you talk about dropping by McDonald’s you don’t also have to discuss how ranching has destroyed the rain forests before you order a large fry. When you buy a new shirt, you don’t also discuss how the fast clothing industry is creating more trash than we know what to do with or the slave labor practices that many companies employ before you hit order now.

All of us compartmentalize every single day with no issue but suddenly when it’s people of color we have to talk about EVERYTHING. Especially the things that are negative. This isn’t because the vandalism is greater than the protest itself or because a years old criminal record excuses the death of an unarmed man, it’s because those things help to demonize Blackness.

We are socially conditioned to find the wrongness in Black people to make their problems their fault. If they weren’t a criminal, they wouldn’t have been shot. If they protested peacefully they would get more attention, if, if, if. And all that does is excuse the institutional racism that created these situations in the very first place.

Your social conditioning and culture are why you “can’t” speak on the protests without speaking about looters. Your social conditioning and culture are why you look for a criminal record when an unarmed Black man has been shot but you look for a sports record or charity when a White dude gets caught sticking his dick somewhere it doesn’t belong. You’ve been taught to demonize Blackness and uphold the goodness of Whiteness.

Unlearn that.

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All Things Aren’t Equal, Stop Discussing Them That Way

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Right now there are protests going on in Charlotte, North Carolina because yet again, another unarmed Black man was shot by the police. During this protest some people have chosen to use this time destroy property and loot. You might be compelled share some opinion about how you feel about that in relation to the protests that are happening. Don’t do that.

You may be thinking that it’s only fair to discuss the looting in as well, to bring attention to the problem. But you’re wrong and you’re likely compelled to speak on it, not by fairness, but by unconscious racism.

There will always be people who are opportunistic and use a time of unrest to be violent or to engage in some sort of criminal activity. That doesn’t mean that protest itself is about violence or that the people who are protesting are violent. However, when you focus the discussion on the violence, especially when it is in relation to Black protest, you are in fact helping to contribute to a narrative of antiblackness.

You are taking focus away from a needed conversation and discussion on racism and directing attention instead to something that fits the narrative of Black people as violent. There are people who would say that I am trying to distract from the TRUTH of how Black people REALLY are but I’m not talking to those people, because those people are openly racist. I’m talking to people who would like to work on their own internalized racism, especially white people who want to be better allies.

I want to address, here, something that I see all repeated that ignoring this violence would be like ignoring ISIS or ignoring police brutality because those are the minority of larger nonviolent groups but this is really just really one of the most common logical fallacies, the false equivalency. I talk about it a lot because it happens so often.

At first glance, protesters to rioters vs cops to cops who shoot unarmed people, for instance, seem to be comparable because they are both these minority groups inside of a much larger collection. But this breaks down when we start to look at it further.

People are protesting and some people are using the opportunity to commit crimes. The second thing has nothing to do with the goals and the drive of the first thing. But when you spend time focusing on illegal activities of that minority, you’re taking part in a narrative that supports the culture of antiblack racism.

Police officers are shooting black people while the majority of officers are not. Although the majority of officers have never shot anyone, black or white, when we pull back from these incidents and look at a larger view of the system as a whole, we can see how multiple issues feed into the end result of unjustified shooting of people of color. And honestly, we are looking at and discussing the ENTIRE justice system, not just the cops that pull the trigger.

The first step in really doing antiracism work as a white person either as an activist or just for your own self, is stepping back and realizing that you can’t discuss everything on equal terms because everything is not on equal terms. The push to make things, as they are now, seem equal in discussion is a way to discredit and undermine the oppressed.

For example, if two people go the ER and one has a crushed finger and the other a crushed ribcage, we wouldn’t just say they both have some broken bones and make them both wait for beds. Similarly, if the family of the ribcage victim is screaming and crying for help, the finger victim wouldn’t turn to them ask why they couldn’t just pipe down and wait their turn. When you look bigger picture, it becomes clear that although they have a similar issue at the most basic level, once you pull back, you can see that they are in fact very different. You have to consider the larger narrative and ask yourself what does this discussion serve?

Why are they looting and breaking things? Because those people are opportunistic individuals who have chosen to commit criminal acts. Now, what does that have to do with the protests? Does it add anything positive to conversation? Does it foster greater understanding between people? Does taking time out to discuss this minority in relation to the greater whole do anything other than support a narrative of antiblackness?

Apply that strategy to all your interactions regarding race, gender, ableism, etc. We all enter into spheres carrying our own biases and we need to do the work in reviewing them and confronting them. This post dealt with racism but the same practices need to employed by people of privilege when engaging in discussions with and regarding the needs of marginalized people. Even if you’re a marginalized person in some other way, if you hold privilege in the space you are in, then you need to do this work.

Violence Isn’t an Answer, It’s a Reaction

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Aleeyah is a hero to Black America right now and really she should be to all PoC. During a time in our country where one of the leading Presidential candidates is running on a platform of fear and hate, openly backed by racists and bigots who want nothing more than to harm brown people, she took a stand and said, “No, you will not.”

I know there’s a flood of people who are saying, violence is not the answer! She should have just walked away! As if the girl who felt confident to look Aleeyah in the face and call her a nigger didn’t deserve to popped right in the mouth.

Aleeyah’s actions are counter to the narrative of the “right” way to react when faced with racism. People of color are supposed to turn the other cheek. We’re not supposed to be upset. We are supposed to smile and sing “We shall overcome” while wearing suits and marching to church.

Here’s a quick history lesson for everyone though. Black people tried that, it was a big deal. The suits and singing and blessings. All of that. They were met with dogs and water hoses. Police that beat them with batons.

Their very peaceful demonstrations were met with violence. And to top it all off, the figure head of peaceful protest in the United States, the man that people trot out when they want to condemn any person of color for being upset when verbally or physically attacked by racists, Martin Luther King Jr, was shot.

The most peaceful, most respectable protestor who preached love and taught unity was shot and killed.

Fast forward to 2016 where we are still dealing with a ton of racially fueled violence. It is not surprise that Aleeyah, when met with it, choose to strike rather than just offer her cheek to be struck. It is completely understandable why she hit that girl. That is not what people should be talking about.

What needs to be discussed is why that girl felt like it was ok for her to call Aleeyah a nigger in the first place. We’re not really going to ask that though because we already know why she felt like it was ok. Because it was ok. Because America has a huge problem with racism and if you haven’t noticed it, you’re not paying attention.

So stop looking at Aleeyah and asking her why. Look at that other nameless white girl and ask her why she felt ok. Ask the society and culture that made her feel it was ok why. But don’t waste Aleeyah’s time asking why she swatted the wasp that stung her.